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 Post subject: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 4:57 pm 
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Capped Wells Possible Option
Question originally poised by (Kate) at Fluwikie
http://magictour.free.fr/fw/FW0079.HTM

:?: Does anyone know if capped wells can be uncovered and used again and if so, can it be used as a secondary water supply in case of 'trouble'? It would be like using the city water supply every day and if the city water goes off then I would switch to using the well water.

:arrow: (Kim)
You'd have to have the well uncapped and have a water sample analyzed to determine if the water was good for drinking.


Last edited by Readymom on Fri Jul 27, 2012 3:43 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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 Post subject: Follow Up: How Close can a well be to a Septic System?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:00 pm 
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Follow Up: How Close can a well be to a Septic System?

Originally posted at the same link as noted above in original entry. The thinking is that NO, it's not far enough way. Go to the link below to read more:

:?: Also is 50 feet far enough in between the water and the septic? It sure doesn’t seem like it.

:arrow: http://magictour.free.fr/fw/FW0079.HTM


Last edited by Readymom on Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject: Hand Pumps for Wells
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 3:37 pm 
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Hand Pumps for Wells

Original post by (Jonesie) at FluTrackers:
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showth ... #post71811

Because the power is expected to go out for months at a time during a pandemic, the farmers in my area with existing water wells are installing hand pumps to water their livestock and supply their personal use.

Hand pumps are available for deep wells going down as far as 300'.
The equipment for shallow wells is less costly.

Compare prices, they do vary considerably for the same equipment. Here is a source with diagrams to give you an idea of what the equipment looks like for a NEW WELL:
http://www.survivalunlimited.com/handwaterpumpdeep.htm

Pumping Basics for Deep Wells

NOTE: Type of pump head may differ from the picture on left but installation requirements are the same.

If water is less than 300 ft down: You need four basic components to raise water from these depths.
1) The pump-head is the part you see above ground and provides the pumping action. Ours work on any well (dug or drilled). Some can be used with windmills.
2) The cylinder is the heart of the system. It contains the valves and leathers or seals that provide the lift. Place in well below water level. Most work best with a foot valve. The cylinder you choose must fit into your well casing.
3) The drop pipe extends from the pump to the cylinder. We recommend galvanized steel or PVC (Plastic). (Steel is the traditional favorite, but plastic is less expensive, much lighter and will never rust.)
4) The pump rod runs from the pump to the cylinder inside the drop pipe. It provides the linkage that transfers the pumping action from pump-head to cylinder.
All our deep well components are USA made to the highest standards.
For pumping from 9'-300' use our Stainless Pump Head w/Cylinder Set, or for pumping from 0'-100' you can use our "Good” Deep Well Pump Head w/Cylinder set, or our stainless steel unit with the 1-12" cylinder.

If your well is much deeper than 300', (to 600') then a solar pump may be useful:

http://www.survivalunlimited.com/sunrisewaterpump.htm
http://www.otherpower.com/otherpower_waterpumping.html

THERE ARE HAND PUMPS FOR EXISTING WELLS WITH ELECTRIC PUMPS. BOTH ARE INSTALLED SIDE BY SIDE AND WILL WORK INDEPENDANTLY OF EACH OTHER.
http://www.jatsgreenpower.com/water-pump-sp.html

Again, there are a lot of companies supplying pumps and drilling wells, so look around to find the one that best suits your needs.

If you are thinking of drilling a new well, Montana's website has a lot of useful information:
http://dnrc.mt.gov/wrd/water_op/bwwc/pd ... lowner.pdf

On the farm I once owned we had 2 water wells. One was a 90' shallow well with a hand pump. The water was the greatest. We carried it into the house every day for drinking and cooking. The other was installed for the livestock. It was a much deeper well, 250', had an electric pump, and was very hard mineral water. We piped it into the house for laundry and bathing.


Last edited by Readymom on Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject: Hand Pumps for Wells-2
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:52 pm 
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Hand Pumps-Discussion

Image
http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.ph ... highlight=

:?: Original post by (Stockmama):
Hi all,
Wondering if I could get some advice on a hand pump I just bought at a garage sale. It's a 25 ft capable hand pump, and we share a common well with our neighbors, and we have a pump house. I have never been inside of it, as we rent. Would it be possible during and extended outage to use the handpump to get water from the well house?
Thanks!!

:arrow: (Bannor)
It depends on whether the water level is below 25ft under ground. That's kind of shallow for a well, but I don't know your water table there.

Find out how deep the well is, or the water level in it.

Then, if you really want to test it, get some hose for the pump that is at least as long as your water level is deep and go to the pump house and open the well cap. Push the hose in there and see if you can hit water and, if you do, if that pump is capable of lifting beyond 25 ft.

http://www.lehmans.com and some other sites have alternative hand well pumps. Lehmans is kind of expensive, but there were some others I remember, but don't have the links, that were not as bad.

For further discussion, go to: http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.ph ... highlight=


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2007 3:16 pm 
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http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.ph ... highlight=

An Inexpensive, Do-It-Yourself Water Well

Original post by (maysday) at Plan For Pandemic:

:arrow: This is a really good site. Lot's of well info with some pictures.

http://www.fdungan.com/well.htm

An Inexpensive, Do-It-Yourself Water Well

If you can drive a nail into a board, you have the skills to augment your water supply. Drilling companies charge thousands of dollars to tap ground water sources that you can often reach yourself with a few common tools and about two weekends of work.

Methods ranging from digging to blasting are used to reach the underground layer of fresh water that lies beneath dry land. Most of these are too technical, expensive, or dangerous for the average person. However, at the turn of the century the U.S. Army developed a fast, effective method to provide bivouacking troops with water that did not involve a lot of expensive, cumbersome equipment. Soldiers simply drove a pipe into the ground with a sledgehammer until they reached the aquifer. Subsequently, it has proven to be ideal for supplying water to homesteads, second homes, and remote villages in developing nations.

If driving a pipe 75 feet or so into the earth sounds like a job for Superman, I've given you the wrong impression. Too hard of a blow can damage pipe threads. It's better to soften the ground as much as possible before you begin. I recommend digging a hole at the site you've selected and allowing water to settle in it for a week. The softer the ground, the easier the work. A shallow hole (5 to 10 feet) is best because deep ones too often need reinforcement to prevent them from collapsing.

Choose a location as far as possible from septic tanks, sewer lines, chemical storage tanks, animal pens, and other potential contaminants. Check with county health officials concerning regulations and permit requirements. County officials have access to well logs and other geological data and can advise you as to subsurface composition (silt, sand, and decomposed granite are suitable for driven wells; hard clay or rock may prove difficult or impossible to penetrate), the approximate depth at which you can expect to find water, and the quality of the aquifer beneath your site.

You can also check with your neighbors. A weight on the end of a string dropped down a neighbor's well can give you a rough estimate of how far down you will have to go (measure to the point where the string becomes wet). Neighbors, particularly old-timers, can often give you some idea of what lies beneath the subsoil. If that doesn't work for you, pick a spot outside the drip line of a large hickory, walnut, butternut, white oak, or hornbeam tree that is not being irrigated. Since these types of trees have tap roots (maples, among others, do not), the fact that they are doing well without irrigation indicates that their tap roots are anchored in an aquifer. I live in a community where the street trees are immense despite the fact that they receive negligible rainfall and quite often aren't being irrigated. Common sense told me that the water table could not be more than 80 feet below the surface.

You'll need a 2-inch drivepoint with screen (a hollow, conically shaped metal point adjoined to a fine mesh screen), several spools of teflon tape, 2-inch galvanized couplings to attatch pipe lengths together, 5-foot-long threaded lengths of 2-inch galvanized Schedule 40 pipe, 2-inch galvanized caps for the pipe, concrete mix, a weight, a foot valve, and 85 feet of 1/2 inch inside diameter, thick-walled, flexible, UV resistant, flexible polyethylene tubing (I used Toro "funny pipe" irrigation tubing).

Dig a 5 foot deep pit, fill it with water, and allow the water to percolate into the ground so as to soften/lubricate the subsoil. Make sure the drivepoint is perpendicular to the ground - check it frequently with a level. If it is not straight, pull it out and start again. A slanted well wastes pipe and may be difficult to pump.

Use a heavy wooden mallet or maul to drive the capped galvanized pipe into the ground. wooden mallet/maulHit the capped pipe as evenly as possible in the center of the cap and avoid side-to-side swaying of the pipe. A well-placed blow will make a dull sound rather than a ping. When the cap becomes cracked or dented, discard it and screw on a new one. Establish a steady rhythm and the work will go easier. When the cap is about even with the bottom of the pit, unscrew it and screw on a coupling and a new length of pipe. Use teflon tape on the pipe threads, and make certain all connections are tightened securely with a pipe wrench. You may occasionally need to work from a step ladder in order to reach the cap with the maul. When going through clay or shale, you may find it easier to use a sledgehammer, but be careful not to overdo it.

If the drivepoint hits a large rock, pull the point out and start again in a new location. To pull out the drivepoint, place two hydraulic automobile jacks on opposite sides of the pipe. Attatch a pipe clamp to the pipe for the jacks to lift against. Once the drivepoint lifts a few inches, it should be easy to remove.

When you believe you have reached water, tie a weight onto a length of string and lower it into the pipe. If it comes out wet, repeat the test several times over the next two days, and if the results are the same, you've found water. Drive the pipe down some more to compensate for seasonal fluctuations and periods of drought.

INSTRUCTIONS

The last step is adding a sanitary seal to prevent surface runoff from contaminating the aquifer. Lengthen the pipe to a height approximately 3 feet above the surface of the ground and fill the pit with the original soil. To protect your water supply and anchor your well, pour a small concrete slab into forms made of used 2-by-4's or 2-by-6's centered around the pipe at the surface. Install insulation around the pipes to protect your well from damage if the temperature where you live drops below freezing in winter.

Pitcher pumps like the one in the photograph at the beginning of this article are ideal for shallow wells. At depths greater than 25 feet, however, they stop working due to the limitations of atmospheric pressure. Inertia pumps (one-way footvalves attatched to flexible irrigation tubing) like the one in the next photograph are the simplest (they contain only one moving part) and least expensive (under $20) manual deep well pump.

driven well

If you have indoor plumbing or sprinklers, you will need a powered pump. Should the flow and/or pressure prove insufficient, you can either hook up multiple wells in series or install a storage tank. Inexpensive solar powered pumps are available, but I cannot vouch for their dependability.


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2010 2:05 am 
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Posts: 2445
Hand Pumps

Image original post by (Rod) @ American Preppers Network:

Image The old ways
http://americanpreppersnetwork.net/view ... 882#p30882

:arrow: Some hand pump info. I have collected in case I ever had a well.

http://www.bisonpumps.com/
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/ ... _5846_5846
http://www.oasispumps.com/pumps.html
http://www.simplepump.com/

To keep shallow well hand pumps from freezing in cold weather, just drop the prime (raise the handle all the way and holding it there a short while) when done pumping. Leathers do freeze when the pump isn't in use but thaw out quickly when re-priming as long as priming water isn't too cold and you don't start pumping too fast ( give the priming water a few seconds to soften frozen leathers. You do have to be careful not to use hot water re-priming it as you could crack cast iron. Of course there is less chance of cracking if you have a hand pump with a brass sleeve (cylinder).

One thing important to remember is mount the pump on something solid, don't just screw it onto the end of the pipe. The pumping will eventually crack or break the pipe at the threads. It doesn't have to be cement (unless you never plan to pull the pipe or service the point) or for some reason have to seal the well. A good heavy plank box and runoff gutter works fine. Just put the pail on the ground under the gutter and pump. It also keeps the water from running back down the well and hard-packing the dirt around the pipe.

:arrow: (peekachoo)
Image I have used several of these. http://www.harborfreight.com/general-me ... -1318.html


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 2:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2445
Wells

LDS Preparedness Manual
http://www.green-trust.org/freebooks/Preparedness.pdf

Page 110

Wells
Water can only be moved by suction for an equivalent head of about 20'. After this cavitation occurs, that is the water boils off in tiny bubbles in the vacuum created by the pump rather than being lifted by the pump. At best no water is pumped, at worst the pump is destroyed. Well pumps in wells deeper than this work on one of the following principles:

1) The pump can be submerged in the well, this is usually the case for deep well pumps. Submersible pumps are available for depths up 1000 feet.

2) The pump can be located at the surface of the well, and two pipes go down the well: one carrying water down, and one returning it. A jet fixture called an ejector on the bottom of the two hoses causes well water to be lifted up the well with the returning pumped water. These pumps must have an efficient foot valve as there is no way for them to self-prime. These are commonly used in shallow wells, but can go as deep as 350 feet. Some pumps use the annular space between one pipe and the well casing as the second pipe this requires a packer (seal) at the ejector and at the top of the casing.

3) The pump cylinder can be located in the well, and the power source located above the well. This is the method used by windmills and most hand pumps. A few hand pumps pump the water from very shallow wells using an aboveground pump and suction line. A variety of primitive, but ingenious, pump designs also exist. One uses a chain with buckets to lift the water up. Another design uses a continuous loop rope dropping in the well and returning up a small diameter pipe. Sealing washers are located along the rope, such that water is pulled up the pipe with the rope. An ancient Chinese design used knots, but modern designs designed for village level maintenance in Africa use rubber washers made from tires, and will work to a much greater depth. Obviously a bucket can be lowered down the well if the well is big enough, but this won’t work with a modern drilled well. A better idea for a drilled well is to use a 2' length or so of galvanized pipe with end caps of a diameter that will fit in the well casing. The upper cap is drilled for a screw eye, and a small hole for ventilation. The lower end is drilled with a hole about half the diameter of the pipe, and on the inside a piece of rigid plastic or rubber is used as a flapper valve. This will allow water to enter the pipe, but not exit it. The whole assembly is lowered in the well casing, the weight of the pipe will cause it to fill with water, and it can then be lifted to the surface. The top pipe cap is there mostly to prevent the pipe from catching as it is lifted.


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 4:09 am 
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Cleaning a Well

Image

Cleaning a well
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/barden105.html

By Pat Barden

-snip-

Starting out, we had to:
    * inspect the works and remedy the source of the water contamination

    * replace the wooden lids

    * purify the water

Sounds simple, doesn’t it?

The first thing was to take off . . . . --- Continued at link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 4:03 am 
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Well Water Bucket-Non Electric Type

Image

Original Post by: (Highwater Filters) at survivalistboards.com

:arrow: Well WaterBoy Products
http://www.wellwaterboy.com/

Image The WaterBoy is designed like old-fashioned metal cylinder buckets, but made of sturdy PVC pipe to last for years of continuous use -- not just emergencies. The unique thumb-lever release at the bucket top prevents water contamination and simplifies use. --- CONTINUED at Link, above ---

:arrow: (anchorbanger ):

A similar product is a bailer. I've used these on "recovery wells" at gas station UST leaks as well as drinking water wells. A length of PVC pipe, a tapering end and a small ball similar to a snorkel but in reverse or a check valve of any creation you can come up with.

I've used these up to 250'. Length of the well, diameter and length of the bailer as well as the diameter of the line you will use (you dont want to use thin line on a long run) will decide just how far you can go.

Cheaper too.

Some Links: http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/produ ... ing+Bailer

OR....make your own.

VIDEOS:

How to Make a Bailer Bucket
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzD6k2OoQ5Y

Build Your Own Well Pump
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdUlyblmKhQ


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 4:12 am 
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MORE Discussion on Other Forum

Image

Water from your Well with no Electricty
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showth ... p?t=197059


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 6:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2445
Water Well-Make one! Do-It-Yourself

Image

An Inexpensive, Do-It-Yourself, Small Diameter Water Well
http://www.fdungan.com/well.htm

If you can drive a nail into a board, you have the skills to augment your water supply. Drilling companies charge thousands of dollars to tap ground water sources that you can often reach yourself with a few common tools and about two weekends of work.

Methods ranging from digging to blasting are used to reach the underground layer of fresh water that lies beneath dry land. Most of these are too technical, expensive, or dangerous for the average person. However, at the turn of the century the U.S. Army developed a fast, effective method to provide bivouacking troops with water that did not involve a lot of expensive, cumbersome equipment. Soldiers simply drove a pipe into the ground with a sledgehammer until they reached the aquifer. Subsequently, it has proven to be ideal for supplying water to homesteads, second homes, and remote villages in developing nations.

If driving a pipe 75 feet or so into the earth sounds like a job for Superman, I've given you the wrong impression. Too hard of a blow can damage pipe threads. It's better to soften the ground as much as possible before you begin. I recommend digging a hole at the site you've selected and allowing water to settle in it for a week. The softer the ground, the easier the work. A shallow hole (5 to 10 feet) is best because deep ones too often need reinforcement to prevent them from collapsing.

Choose a location as --- CONTINUEd at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2016 4:29 pm 
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Water Wells-Dig Your Own

Image

Water Well – DIY Water Well in a Day
http://www.diyreport.com/2015/07/14/water-well-diy-water-well-in-a-day/

Image For anyone lucky enough to have a shallow water table without bedrock, a do-it-yourself driven well saves thousands of dollars compared to having a bored well drilled. Under ideal conditions, a well can be driven in a few hours and fitted with a pitcher pump, creating an uncomplicated, inexpensive backup or everyday water supply. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Water Storage: Wells & Well Pumps
PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 3:53 am 
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Well Pump-Coiled Pipe Wheel

Image

Pump Water Without Electricity – energy of flowing water
http://www.diyreport.com/2015/04/01/pump-water-without-electricity-energy-of-flowing-water/

Image A water wheel uses the energy of flowing water to move the water through coiled pipe and as it spins it continues adding water through the coils. Depending upon where you set the output pipes you can move water from a creek to your field without electricity. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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